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Becoming A World Power

Topic [BIG IDEA]:

  • Why did the United States seek to become an imperialist power?
  • Was sympathy for the Cuban people or economic expansion the motive for war with Spain?
  • Explain the importance of the Panama Canal to America's growth as a world power.

Skill Addressed:

  • Interpret timelines that show how events are related to one another [mod] (H)
  • Interpret and construct charts and graphs that show quantitative information. (H, C, E)
  • Identify cause and effect relationships. [mod] (H, C, E)
  • Distinguish intended from unintended consequences. (H, E, C)
  • Show connections between particular historical events and social, economic, and political trends. [mod] (H, G, C, E)
  • Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source[mod]
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.

Concepts the Students Will Acquire:

  • During the late 1800’s the desire to find new markets, increase trade, and build a powerful navy caused the United States to become more involved in world affairs.
  • The United States defeated Spain in a war, acquired new overseas territories, and became an imperial power.
  • Under President Theodore Roosevelt, the United States increased its power on the world stage.

Massachusetts Social Studies Standards in WHS Curriculum

USII.6 Analyze the causes and course of America’s growing role in world affairs from the Civil War to World War I. (H, E)

  • The influence of the ideas associated with Social Darwinism
  • America’s growing influence in Hawaii leading to annexation
  • The Spanish-American War
  • America’s role/motives in the building of the Panama Canal

Common Core Standards in WHS Curriculum

Key Ideas & Details:

  • Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
  • Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, and causally).

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

  • Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with information in print and digital texts.
  • Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.
  • Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

  • Use content reading strategies to read and comprehend the history text with increasing independence. [mod]

Respond to Open Response Questions with U.S. History Studies specific content in the RAFT format. [mod]

WORD WALL Terms: Imperialism, Protectorate, Anglo-Saxonism, Expansion, Diplomacy, Yellow Journalism, Jingoism, Intervene, Volunteer, Rebellion, Autonomy